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20140306
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
in arizona this week and in you began uganda. a huge ongoing clash between religion and tolerance in my view, which is playing itself out good and bad in places. great in many ways. you're seeing a lot of gay rights being encouraged around america, for example, but in arizona a big backwards step in terms of the thinking of some people there. what's the way around this in terms of -- i have great respect for people who are very religious and interpret the bible in a certain way and it makes them have views about things like homosexuality or whatever it may be. i just don't like it when people who don't agree with something use bigoted rhetoric. i think that's a step too far. but there's a wider issue here of tolerance. and you guys are great examples of very intolerant, implaquable divides coming together. what do you think, roma? how's the best way to handle it? >> i think that perhaps as christian people we become known as people who speak out against things instead of being people who speak out for. and instead of what we oppose it's what we propose. and i think we propose love. i mean, w
exercise of religion, sincerely held religious beliefs. >> opponents of the bill claimed victory for an open attack on gays. >> this showed the nation that not all arizonians are like extremists, and that there are good people, and we want to lead the country forward, not backwards. >> a statement was issued, praising her decision. >> major corporations weighed in too. apple, american airlines, delta and the n.f.l. all urged governor jan brewer to veto the measure. >> it was a combination. business community and activist. >> it sent a message to the governor. >> and speaking of the business community, supporters of the bill have been saying that there is a lot of support by local businesses. one of our producers here made several calls, 50 businesses, dry cleaners, hair salons, and could not find a local business behind it. >> thank you. we should point out the veto of the bill in arizona does not end the debate open over religious freedom nationwide. it got further, being a signature away from the governor to become war. similar balls failed to pass in kansas, idaho, south dakot
because of their religion so she didn't think the bill made accepts. your organization release add statement today that read "this legislation would give homosexuals more protection than they did under the current law". given nobody could come up with example of the discrimination, how could they have more protection under a law essentially created to allow people who didn't want to serve gays getting married with things like photography or wedding cakes? >> well, the irony is that arizona does not currently have sexual orientation listed as a protected category in either their employment nondiscrimination laws or public accommodation laws. so the current state of the law in arizona is that anybody can discriminate against gays at any time for any reason or for no reason whatsoever. this bill deals only with when a government action conflicts with a person's sincerely held religious belief. it requires the person asserting that right to be able to prove that this is motivated by the religious belief, that that belief is sincerely held, and that the government action is a substantia
of behavior do you think they could get away with, based on religion? i mean, what we're talking about here is an amendment to an existing law that has been in place since 1999. it simply is closing -- well, not really a loophole, but court interpretation. it was originally passed as when you were an individual and went into a business or marketplace, you don't lose your religious freedoms, but some courts have interpreted that. but they also put in place a test that would prove, you have to prove you have the basis for your religious objection. >> a lot of people ignored that. you couldn't just go out and -- and make up a religious belief. let me ask you this, folks on the other side this is what this bill was, the modern-day equivalent of you can deny services of blacks who want to marry whites. blacks that used to get together, that used to be against the bible, against god's teaching. that was outlawed for three centuries and was not deemed illegal to do so to discriminate against blacks and whites who want to marry until 1867. and folks opposed to it said this is the modern-day equival
of vatileaks and the istituto per le opere di religione-- from the bank, from also some cases of corruption with the narco business, some cases of pedophilia. the credibility of the church is in terrible danger. what is necessary to do? how can we listen to the voices of the holy spirit in order to change? because everybody knew it was necessary to change many things. >> narrator: pope francis has shared that message in the most unlikely places. >> (translated): the phone rang. "i've got the pope on the line, and i really don't think we should keep him waiting." >> narrator: eugenio scalfari is the founder and editor-in-chief of la repubblicaitaly's leading newspaper on the left. he is also an atheist. >> (translated): the conversation we had started with some jokes, because that's his way. he said, "some of my advisors have warned me to be careful talking to you because you're a clever man and you'll try to convert me." me, converting the pope! >> narrator: the pope had phoned to invite scalfari for a chat. it would be a wide-ranging discussion which scalfari described in an article that
loves her. >> less catering to the muslim religion than she is the muslim dollar or whatever. >> what do you think? do you think she's caving to the dollar or could you think she's afraid she will get ousted? >> not a simple answer. i think it's probably a combination of both but if you had to pick one or the oh, i think it's fear factor. look, there's repercussions. everybody knows it at this table, right? it's not just talk. they act, and they do some of the most vicious heinous things like murdering children, so wouldn't you be a little concerned? i don't blame her for that. >> if i'm concerned i'm in real trouble. from the public relation standpoint, if you were the head of the muslim country wouldn't you think it would be a good idea to at least step forward and say this does not represent all of us? >> i've never actually visualized myself being a spokesperson for the muslim countries, but, yes, i would have to say yes, i would. i have a question. how did the muslims even see that? you ever heard that somebody wants to be offend they will find a way to be offended. >> right, right,
, what they want to do. either as an individual or a nation. the monotheistic religions of the world all push its members to fight against poverty. but right now the united states of america, the rich are getting richer, and the poor are getting what the rich don't take with them. >> congressman emanuel cleaver and sister simone campbell, i'm going to have to leave it there. thank you both for your time tonight. >> thank you, reverend. >> good to be here. >>> still ahead, a top democrat calls out republicans for their dependence on billionaire koch brothers. >>> but first, new surveillance video of a deadly shooting inside a walmart. one man is dead and the shooter has not been arrested. we'll talk about it next. covert ops? double agents? spy thriller? you don't know "aarp" thanks to the aarp tek program, this guy is spying on his new grandson. aarp tek gets people better connected to technology, to better connect with each other. with social media, digital devices and apps. if you don't think "hashtag love dad" when you think aarp, then you don't know "aarp" find more surprising possib
claim it will cause discrimination based upon religion. i stopped at that until tonight. a muslim waiter serving up here walked up to the sheriff and wouldn't give in because he said i don't serve swine. >> i know you couldn't hear that, but you were there. you were live at first when he made the comment about senate bill 1062 which you have been talking a lot about this week. a lot of people thought that could create a situation that you thought was okay. in that comment, he talked about muslims and so i guess my question to you is, is it ever okay. given our country's history to throw race outer and use it. >> i was the top guy in south america and turkey and the mideast. i know a little about foreign countries. i know about racism. i'm not going to get into my family's background. he was just making some comments. i didn't tell him what to do. i got him five minutes before. governor perry was talking about me. a lot of people roasted me. why did they put it out yesterday? why not three days ago. why did they wait for the governor's decision. you can see the politics involved in this.
or religion" or have -- quote -- "antipathy toward people who aren't like them." when i served in the house of representatives in 2009 speaker nancy pelosi said in a town hall meeting in august of this year that those with concerns about obamacare, those with concerns about obamacare were -- quote -- "un-american." no one has the right to determine whose believes are american or un-american. certainly no one in the united states house of representatives or the united states senate. it's troubling that there is a reflexive reaction in congress to label critics as unloyal. recognizing disagreement is part of the decision-making process of our democracy and arpful die long between all americans is critical to a well-functioning republic. certainly anything short of that is not worthy, is not worthy of the senate floor. i'm weary of the repeated attempted to distract the american people from the rollout and poor performance of obamacare. this week "the new york times" poll -- new york/cbs poll found that only 6% of americans believe that obamacare is working well and should be kept in place as
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)